Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Messier headed for the Hall

The AOL Fanhouse tabbed me to come up with who I think will be selected for induction to the Hockey Hall of Fame tomorrow, and my picks turn out to be rather predictable: Mark Messier, Al MacInnis, Ron Francis and Scott Stevens.

Igor Larionov's got an outside shot to upset and sneak in there, mainly due to his international experience, but those top four are as close as you can get to mortal locks, either this year or next.

And the list of top-notch players not in the Hall continues to grow... although that's not necessarily a bad thing.

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3 Comments:

At 2:58 PM, June 27, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

And the list of top-notch players not in the Hall continues to grow... although that's not necessarily a bad thing.

You know, it still kind of bugs me that the selectors limit the selections to 4 per year: it just seems like an arbitrary bureaucratic decision, but I'll gladly put up with it if it improves the quality of the nominees. A larger problem though is when they feel they have to go up to four in years when its not warranted. I guess the idea is to create a slight backlog of quality that can fill in the potholes of the lean years.

 
At 3:25 PM, June 27, 2007, Anonymous pete said...

I could be convinced to support Larionov over Stevens.

Larionov gets points for being a groundbreaker in terms of the Russian invastion.

But Stevens deserves credit for reinventing himself from a 60-70 point PP quarterback into a tough as nails stay at home defenseman when the situation demanded it.

Tough call. I'd say the other three are locks.

 
At 1:31 AM, June 28, 2007, Blogger J. Michael Neal said...

Larionov gets points for being a groundbreaker in terms of the Russian invastion.

It's not just that he was a groundbreaker in terms of Russian players making it to the NHL, it's how he, and Fetisov, were groundbreakers. They stood up and challenged Viktor Tikhonov and the Soviet government directly, back when that wasn't a safe thing to do in many cases. They displayed a type of moral courage that professional athletes are very rarely called upon to exercise.

I don't blame the defectors for what they did (I think that defecting was a highly sensible decision), but Igor and Slava demonstrated a love of country and determination to stand for something that puts them on a different level. Larionov may not make it into the Hall on his on-ice performance alone, though I'd argue that he should. In the bigger picture, the Hockey Hall of Fame needs Igor Larionov, the man, a lot more than the man needs the Hall.

 

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