Saturday, October 04, 2008

From Russia with rubles
Team salaries in the KHL

It seems that one of the ways that Russia's Continental Hockey League is trying to mimic the NHL is in salary disclosure, something the KHL did for the first time on its official website earlier this week:
For the first time in the history of Russian hockey withdrawn seal of secrecy on one of the most cherished secrets: salary fund hockey club.

At Aug. 2, 2008, meeting of the Board of Directors of the Continental Hockey League (KHL), it was decided to disclose financial indicators League club on Oct. 1.

Never before has a salary budget of clubs been disclosed.
Time for someone to setup khlnumbers.com?

The league's salary cap is set at 620 million rubles, which is about $24-million (U.S.). Under Review does a nice job of converting all 24 team salaries to the U.S. dollar, something that gives you an idea of the inequity in the league's salary structure:

1 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl $18.7-million
2 Avangard Omsk $17.1-million
3 Atlant Mytishchi $16.9-million
4 Severstal Cherepovets $16.3-million
5 Metallurg Magnitogorsk $15.7-million
6 Salavat Yulaev Ufa $15.4-million
7 SKA Saint Petersburg $15.4-million
8 Ak Bars Kazan $15.3-million
9 CSKA Moscow $14.5-million
10 Lada Togliatti $12.8-million
11 Torpedo Nizhny Novg. $12.8-million
12 Barys Astana $12.1-million
13 Dynamo Moscow $11.3-million
14 Spartak Moscow $9.4-million
15 Sibir Novosibirsk $8.6-million
16 Neftekhimik Nizhnekam. $8.3-million
17 Metallurg Novokuznetsk $8.2-million
18 Vityaz Chekhov $8-million
19 Traktor Chelyabinsk $7.6-million
20 MVD $7.5-million
21 Amur Khabarovsk $7.4-million
22 Dinamo Riga $5.8-million
23 Dinamo Minsk $4.3-million
24 Khimik Voskresensk $4.3-million

In other words, Sidney Crosby makes more dough than about 40 per cent of KHL teams. And I'm guessing there's no salary floor.

Some of the teams in the basement in terms of payroll are struggling in the standings. Khimik has a 2-8-2 record with only 20 goals scored in 12 games, while Dynamo Minsk has two regulation wins to go with an overtime and a shootout win (they're all counted separately in the KHL standings) in 13 games.

The plucky Latvian squad from Riga, however, is currently in sixth place in the league with six wins and only three regulation losses.

Alexei Morozov currently leads the league in scoring with 22 points in 12 games, while Jaromir Jagr is tied for third with 17 in 14 games. Also among the scoring leaders are former NHLers Magnus Johansson, Marcel Hossa and Alex Radulov.

Chris Simon, otherwise known as Kris Saymon, leads the KHL with 99 PIMs in 10 games.

Ray Emery, meanwhile, is one of the leading goaltenders in terms of save percentage (.927) and goals against average (2.19) but is splitting time with first-place Atlant. The league's full of former NHL netminders, including Jussi Markkanen, Mike Fountain, Tyler Moss, Robert Esche, Wade Dubielewicz, Mike Garnett and Mika Noronen (who has horrible numbers so far).

Some players playing the most minutes are familiar names, too: Kevin Dallman, Tomas Kloucek, Ben Clymer, Alexei Zhitnik and Vitali Vishnevski.

And that's been your KHL update.

UPDATE The KHL salaries have since been updated with some of the higher salaries and bonuses included, and Avangard is now over the $30-million mark.
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14 Comments:

At 8:58 AM, October 04, 2008, Blogger Valerie said...

Wait a minute - something smells fishy. Doesn't Alexi Yashin play for Lokomotiv Yaroslavl? What are the other players paid? Methinks there's a bit of toying with the so-called openness.

 
At 9:03 AM, October 04, 2008, Blogger itchit said...

James could you please let us know how points are awarded for OT wins vs SO wins vs regulation wins etc...
Is it a 4 point system or something?

Thanks and keep up your great work!

 
At 9:55 AM, October 04, 2008, Anonymous Anonymous said...

But KHL is a huge threat to NHL because it based in lovely Russia and they pay less. Another great thing is NFL type contracts... if you get hurt or play bad KHL teams drop you like a hot potato. Crap happens, comrade.

 
At 10:26 AM, October 04, 2008, Blogger Big Picture Guy said...

"Methinks there's a bit of toying with the so-called openness."

The original release (Oct 1) did not include bonuses and salaries to players with NHL contracts (Jagr etc). That was updated yesterday-I have updated the figures and rankings at http://urhma.blogspot.com They now show that three of the divisional leaders are also the teams with the highest salaries and that the gap from top to bottom is more than 700% (31 mil to 4 mil).

Credit should go to posters at the Hockey's Future boards KHL thread who have been following this.

I wonder why the Secret Police team (HC MVD) is so far down the list at 7.3 million-they must have cleared that much in a single day's looting after they invaded Georgia (sorry, can't resist a political dig)

 
At 10:46 AM, October 04, 2008, Anonymous archleester said...

Can't say much for the order of the standings, but I like the fact the 3-2-1-0 system is used with ot, ot losses,shootout wins, and shootout losses being shown. Apparently there not resistant to having to do a little arithmetic in Russia.

 
At 12:49 PM, October 04, 2008, Anonymous Montreal JF said...

Thanks for the update! I was looking for info on the russian league. never got something that accurate.

 
At 1:26 PM, October 04, 2008, Blogger twoeightnine said...

One thing to remember about the salaries (assuming the KHL is the same as all the other Russian leagues) is that the players pay no income tax. Sure it doesn't matter for the salary cap but for any fringe NHL player it's nice to not have the government take 40% of your paycheck. Plus teams often pick up the living expenses for foreign players.

 
At 2:40 PM, October 04, 2008, Blogger Valerie said...

One thing to remember about the salaries (assuming the KHL is the same as all the other Russian leagues) is that the players pay no income tax.

Ya - what they don't pay in taxes, they pay in personal protection fees.

 
At 4:45 PM, October 04, 2008, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, they do pay taxes in Russia. Flat tax of 13%. Players do have tax-free net deals but that 13% is included in team payrolls.

Anyway, with these new numbers it's great to see that KHL's richest team is spending 10M less than NHL salary cap's floor.

KHL has 5-6 teams that are almost done financially. Players' salaries are paid late, reduced or not at all.

Living expenses are paid but for players in some teams that means living in "baza" where you don't have cable/satellite TV, internet connections etc.

 
At 11:56 AM, October 05, 2008, Blogger B.C.B. said...

I think it is funny (and slightly smacking of cultural chauvinism, or maybe racism) that most of the discussion demeans the KHL teams.

Russian has a high standard of living: privatized first class everything. Internet and satellite TV are common in rich neighbourhoods and downtowns across Eastern Europe: even under Communism the party (now the rich) had a standard of living comparable (yes, but not the same) to the west. The cost of living is lower and hence lower salaries: the hockey players are still well off and can afford everything they want (plus save some in an international bank). I would be surprised if players pay for private sercurity, rather then living in gated communities. Do NHL players pay for personal protection in high crime rate cities in the USA: Detroit, Atlanta, and NYC would fit that bill.

You could also say that in recent NHL history players only got their checks because the league step in (Buffalo comes to mind, maybe Pit). As for parity: pre-lock out there was a huge gap in salaries, while Det/Dal won often, other 'poorer' teams like Florida, Calgary, and TB all had some success in the playoffs.

Don't get me wrong I love the NHL, but we have to open or eyes about discussing the KHL. Right now they are smaller (in terms of talent and paychecks) but it doesn't mean they will always be: the oligarchs have oil money and they won't be in as much trouble as some NHL owners if a depression hits. The NHL looks at the KHL as their retarded little brother throwing them casts off (to get under budget) and crying foul if the KHL fights to not let player go (Malkin, Filatov) and calls them names if the sign a good player the NHL wants to keep (Radulov).

The NHL needs to look to FIFA as a model: where teams sell players to each other. The KHL (and other European leagues) are, and will become less happy about the arrangement sooner then later. The NHL does not have a divine right to bully the other hockey leagues around.

 
At 7:31 PM, October 05, 2008, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Russian has a high standard of living: privatized first class everything. Internet and satellite TV are common in rich neighbourhoods and downtowns across Eastern Europe: even under Communism the party (now the rich) had a standard of living comparable (yes, but not the same) to the west.

Phhhhtt. I got news for you, Comrade. The internet and satellite TV are common in EVERY household in North America.

I would be surprised if players pay for private sercurity, rather then living in gated communities. Do NHL players pay for personal protection in high crime rate cities in the USA: Detroit, Atlanta, and NYC would fit that bill.

Comrade, you should read up on Pavel Bure sometime when you don't have your nose buried in Pravda.

The NHL needs to look to FIFA as a model: where teams sell players to each other.

On this side of the Atlantic, slavery was abolished more than a century ago. Or about 40 years ago if you're MLB. You probably won't find any reference to it on CCCP-1, but if the Kremlin allows you to access the Internet, you could check it out.

 
At 8:58 AM, October 06, 2008, Blogger Doogie2K said...

Phhhhtt. I got news for you, Comrade. The internet and satellite TV are common in EVERY household in North America.

The first, yes. The second, not so much.

On this side of the Atlantic, slavery was abolished more than a century ago. Or about 40 years ago if you're MLB. You probably won't find any reference to it on CCCP-1, but if the Kremlin allows you to access the Internet, you could check it out.

The hell does this even mean? If you're referring to the reserve clause, that wasn't abolished in the NHL until the '70s, though I fail to see what this has to do with football-style transfers: it's like a trade, only for money instead of other players. Holy shit, what a concept. Wonder if the NHL has ever tried that? (Hint: Yes; it was abolished after the lockout, but only because it would play hell with the cap calculations.)

As for the rest, get bent, douchebag. Your attitude is neither wanted nor appreciated.

 
At 8:02 PM, October 09, 2008, Anonymous RDT said...

Here it is > http://www.khlnumbers.com/

 
At 1:31 AM, November 13, 2008, Blogger violator said...

These numbers are not right, these are only official, unofficial are approximately 2 times bigger, because of corruption in Russia.

 

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